Nikolai Vavilov – Wikipedia

Nikolai Ivanovich Vavilov ForMemRS[1] (Russian: Никола́й Ива́нович Вави́лов, IPA: [nʲɪkɐˈlaj ɪˈvanəvʲɪtɕ vɐˈvʲiləf] (About this sound listen)) (November 25 [O.S. November 13] 1887 – January 26, 1943) was a prominent Russian and Soviet agronomist, botanist and geneticist best known for having identified the centres of origin of cultivated plants. He devoted his life to the study and improvement of wheat, corn, and other cereal crops that sustain the global population.[2][3][4][5][6] Vavilov’s work was criticized by Trofim Lysenko, whose anti-Mendelian concepts of plant biology had won favor with Joseph Stalin. As a result, Vavilov was arrested and subsequently sentenced to death in July 1941. Although his sentence was commuted to twenty years’ imprisonment, he died of starvation in prison in 1943.

Source: Nikolai Vavilov – Wikipedia

Today, the N.I. Vavilov Institute of Plant Industry in St. Petersburg still maintains one of the world’s largest collections of plant genetic material.[17] The Institute began as the Bureau of Applied Botany in 1894, and was reorganized in 1924 into the All-Union Research Institute of Applied Botany and New Crops, and in 1930 into the Research Institute of Plant Industry. Vavilov was the head of the institute from 1921 to 1940. In 1968 the institute was renamed after Vavilov in time for its 75th anniversary.

 

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